Nerdette

So…last night I got an alert that there is another local Librarian I position opening up, this time in a Public Library sector. I have until two weeks into January to submit an application, whereas the Academic Library application is due the first week of January.

Is it a good thing that I didn’t narrow my focus between Public and Academic Libraries early? I guess I’ll find out.

I still have to confirm my references and find out who to address my Cover Letter to for the position I’m working on now, but other than that, I think I’m good.

Today…well, we didn’t do too much celebrating, though I think we’re all happy that the Sun is on its way back. To my surprise, I actually did get a few gifts, the cutest of which is a…really big Rilakkuma plushie. With a zipper in his back, and everything. 🙂

(Google it!)

Last night I realized what a nerd I was. (Wait, is it, “nerd,” or, “geek?” “Dork?”) This has been confirmed tonight by the fact that I fixed a computer issue on my own…and it was easy (!).

Then there’s the fact that I work in a Library. And the fact that I’m trying to learn Japanese (for heritage reasons, tho’!), and that I used to be into video games and anime/manga. And am trying to learn coding and Web Programming. And that it’s easier for me to communicate with other people through text as versus speech. Not to mention the arts/crafts/graphic design/literary arts angle, and the fact that I actually aspire to making a webcomic. And have assembled enough resources to make that possible.

I could go on; I just probably shouldn’t. 🙂

I’m not totally sure that the arts angle is nerdmaking, but the fact that in the past, at least, I would be associated with, “books,” is likely notable, and distinguishes me from some…other people, I know. Who live in an entirely different world, one which I have no interest in being a part of. To those people, “nerd,” “geek,” and, “dork,” would be words of condemnation, which means I take it as a mark of pride.

(Of course, now our books are interactive…and, I’m thinking, more of that is coming, as electronic media become more ingrained into society. Does this mean I should be learning video and animation rather than comics? I really don’t know.)

I guess it would be different if I actually did go back to school for math (it would be Calculus) and learned advanced statistical analysis…I just don’t want to do that. I mean, seriously, Database Design was enough. I don’t even want to do the Big Data class, out of fear that I’m just going to get lost, again.

So the plushie is kind of funny/weird, because in Japan at least, Rilakkuma is supposed to represent a bear suit. Rilakkuma isn’t really a bear. He just puts the bear suit on on top of himself…so you don’t really know his true identity.

But arguably, he could be wearing the suit because he likes the way he’s treated when he’s wearing this adorable suit which he intentionally puts on (like being held against young women’s bosoms, which I have done much of, and which Rilakkuma’s flat head encourages). Rilakkuma roughly translates to, “relax bear,” which kind of suggests that he’s setting an example for you to relax with him.

I’ve thought about his design as an extension of a mask, or, “face.”

Yeah, I don’t know. It’s just my interpretation, and I can’t read Japanese well enough yet to get the entire backstory. But I guess that’s what you get when you have adult-themed plushies, as an adult: existential anxiety over not knowing what it is you’re cuddling. Which someone intended.

I’m not even going to get into Gudetama, though that one is kind of funny, if you can muster up the schadenfreude to laugh/worry (and then self-reflect) at the pathos of this apparently clinically depressed egg that wants to go back into its shell…

Though I believe that’s a more common sentiment than some (most?) people would want to acknowledge.

I just realized that I’ve gotta get up early, tomorrow. Rilakkuma’s waiting for me.

😛

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Getting back around to art.

Apologies for the lack of images: today was the first time I really allowed myself to explore with art materials for over two years (or that’s what it feels like, anyway). As such, I’m not entirely to the point of displaying what I made, though I like it well enough to continue.

So…this started out with an outing today. D and I went to a small Asian knickknack store (Japanese-branded stuff, but the name of the store doesn’t sound Japanese) to try and find a replacement for the pouch that got littered full of shredded foam (as I mentioned in my last post). I guess there’s something to be said for the creativity of a culture which routinely uses gifts to show goodwill…the new pouch has a good-luck cat face on it. It was the only thing in the store that came close to what I needed.

As it turns out, it was easy enough to rinse and hand-wash out the pouch that used to hold my jump drives. The cat-face pouch is holding all of my jump drives now, so if the other one gets ruined, I still have an option.

It’s kind of weird that these little purses are my go-to for holding jump drives, but whatever. (They’re padded, and nice.) I could imagine, though, being a little kid and getting this as a present, with stuff inside…it would actually be really cute, and a nice gift.

The major trouble I’ve had in the past with Christmas is that it perennially seemed to be a day where people showed me how much they didn’t know who I was (with the exception of my nuclear family). This is the reason why as an adult, I am purchasing the stuff I really want, on my own. I don’t think that’s the way it’s supposed to work (buying oneself Christmas gifts), but it’s a way I could see things going in the future. Anyhow…

What began with cleaning up my craft table eventually turned into prioritizing and shifting storage (I got the 30 half-stick set of Rembrandt pastels, which needed some place to live), which turned into playing with charcoal and huge flat pencils (which I had to sharpen with a knife), and coming up with a design I liked.

The design itself looks like a red lantern, but it’s basically a back-and-forth motion that I surrounded with strategic areas of darkness, indicating a glow. In turn…I’m thinking I can expand this and make it a motif of a larger drawing.

The major drawback to using marker (as I used on my 4th and 5th iterations of this sketch) is that I can’t get that real subtle shading from dark to light which is so easy to attain with charcoal, unless I use a large number of markers. (Markers also have the drawback of fading, which is just something of which to be aware.)

I also then scribbled in some color, first with a red (Scarlet?) LYRA Color-Giant pencil; then on another working, with red Tombows. The black marker I used was a Pitt Big Brush Pen, which is good for mimicking the mark of a broad piece of round willow charcoal.

After I had done this, it was really apparent that my drawing was very, very “graphic” looking. By that I mean, it’s really bold. At that point I realized that maybe I shouldn’t be fighting the fact that my art looks bold, and got out my dip pen nibs and inks.

I actually have too many inks; this is from a time before I knew how to use decent graphics programs and scanners, so I had been on a quest to find the “blackest” black ink. I used Speedball Super Black tonight, which was fairly nice…I just didn’t realize that I had never opened the bottle!

So it was me and this big pad of drawing paper, and a nib and nib holder (I forget what the nib was called, but it was the Hunt Ex-Fine Bowl, I think: it looks like the Speedball #512. For an “Extra Fine” pen, though…it didn’t really make fine lines).

And to answer that question: no, I still haven’t gotten a replacement lighter to burn off the anti-rust coating of most of these nibs. What I did today was use a nib that my sister gifted to me. Since it was already used, I knew it would hold ink. I did read that the anti-rust coating could be removed with alcohol — or pen cleaner — which is what I may try with my newer nibs (before singeing them as a last resort).

What’s weird is how easily illustration (particularly, with people) is coming to me, now. Maybe I need to stop calling it, “weird,” though. If I’ve been doodling characters for 20 years and have taken multiple life-drawing classes, it’s no longer, “weird,” if it’s easy. I should rather expect that.

It’s also really easy now for me to control a stiff pen point. I think I can thank my Pilot Metropolitan for giving me practice with that…

I also have a sheet of extra Bristol Board that I’ve been screwing around on with my fountain pens, and gave it a go with the dip pen. Other than needing to steady my hand, the Bristol presented no problems with feathering, unlike the drawing paper I was messing around with. I also have DELETER paper, which is basically ultra-smooth, but I’d have to look around a bit to source it again!

I would ideally want to plan out a composition (and, you know, get a script) before I went to Bristol and pen-and-ink, but practice has to start, sometime.

I still have to test out those Princeton Neptune brushes — as I was reminded of by reading backposts, the other night. I’m pretty sure Bristol can handle light washes; I’m not sure about the DELETER paper (as I don’t think I’ve ever tried it with washes).

Of course, then, there’s the option of filling with hatching…hmm. But I’d have to think carefully about that. Unless, that is, I used the Microns, Copic fineliners, and Copic markers (in addition to dip pen?!). I don’t think I ever did try using the Copic markers on Deleter paper…

Electronic decay.

Right now I’m taking a break from filling out job applications. Well — specifically, a job application, for which I spent the better part of the afternoon digging up information. It’s my first application in years, though. I’m finding myself needing to look up the names of people I haven’t thought much about, in the better part of a decade.

At least I was able to access my transcripts. That was good. And I’m actually, surprisingly, looking pretty qualified for this job. It’s also not so bad to be in an urban area: there are a lot of jobs in relatively close proximity. The key seems to be finding one I’m qualified, and a good match, for.

I still have to clean up around here, though. Last night I killed a 1″ long silverfish with my bare hand, because it would have gotten away if I had searched for a tissue. Then I was angry enough at having to kill it (I hate indoor silverfish) that I wondered if it would taste like shrimp.

Okay, grossness over. No, I didn’t eat it. But really, that thing shouldn’t have been in here. It might have been here because the room has been relatively undisturbed for the last few months, and there are a lot of books and papers; not to mention, it’s warm. From what I could see, it could have come from the downstairs library area…which would make sense.

In searching for my original unedited resumé, though, I found a real-life version of something I had learned about theoretically in Digital Curation: bit rot. That is, files on solid-state storage physically decaying until they’re seen by the system as corrupt and unusable. I’ll have to go through my jump drives and see what is actually recoverable, because obviously, “save it and forget it,” doesn’t exist. D says the same thing happens on magnetic storage. Maybe if I ever run across a class on data recovery, it might be worth it to take a look.

From what I can tell, refreshing the data on the jump drives should work (it isn’t the drives themselves which are bad)…but prior to Digital Curation, I wouldn’t have expected my files to corrupt from nothing but time and entropy.

Not to mention, my old computer is on its way out. There’s obviously something wrong with it; I’m just not sure, what. However, files which were corrupted on my jump drives were fine, there.

Speaking of entropy, I had a pair of earbuds (I think they were for my Nintendo DS, but I’m not digging through the trash to find out) in my memory-stick bag which had foam pads which decayed all over the inside of a zip pocket where there was also a memory stick with bits of foam stuck in it. Finding that, was not really great. For one thing, I don’t know how the foam got all over the place like it did. It’s not like I really moved that pouch around, a lot.

I also don’t know whether it’s better to keep the bag and just rinse it out really well, or buy a new one (especially as the bag itself has foam padding). I guess I’ll have to go through my jump drives and see what is still usable.

Hmm. I wonder if my (Nintendo) DS Lite still works? I know for a fact that it keeps a charge over long periods of non-use. I think I just stopped using it after getting bored with Final Fantasy IV (“Wait, where was I, last? What is my current mission? What’s going on??”) and the endless fight scenes which I just barely tolerated in Final Fantasy VII, because I actually cared about the story.

For me, FFIV isn’t like that. Probably because I appreciated FFVII’s cyberpunk angle. I’m just not too impressed by castles and knights…

There was some other game I was playing a really long time ago…I could never get past a certain point…oh, right. Secret of Mana. I still have no idea what to do, there, that won’t result in my character going into areas out of intended order and being annihilated. And that explains why I couldn’t find it in my little game library: it was a download for a different system. It’s just similar enough to Zelda, Alundra, and Chrono Trigger, that they all get blended together in my mind.

Maybe I should just look at a walkthrough. I don’t know how many hours I walked around in the same area before accomplishing the first task in the game…

Anyhow. I rarely ever talk about video games. Until I realize that my cute little seventh generation video game console keeps a charge better than my one-year-old Kindle.

Yep.

No, I don’t know why. Maybe if I turn it off when I’m done using it, instead of just closing the cover, it would keep a charge better (its battery life was excellent, last year). The difference must be, “off,” as versus, “sleep,” though oddly enough, I never thought about it that way.

I’ve been thinking about the way that Amazon has arranged things so that the best way to keep up with one’s digital library is to have a Kindle…with a large library, one could become more or less dependent on having a physical reading device (although there are ways to read on a regular computer).

It’s a drawback which counterbalances the instantaneous provision of information that Amazon makes so easy. The upshot is that as long as Amazon remains in business, the data should be available for download from the cloud (unless, that is, things work out as they often do in academia, and publishers of electronic media decide to stop their provision of access: digital media are often, “licensed,” not, “purchased”).

Hibernating?

For some reason, I slept through most of the day. I’m not entirely sure why, though looking forward to getting a computer back into operating condition is not really my idea of a great time. (I’ve also been having issues with heart flutter, likely related to caffeine sensitization; but neither does it speak well about my level of stress.)

So…let’s see, I was offered an interview to become a Library Assistant, but I’m not too hot on the position — it’s a Substitute/Floater position, just like the one I was offered from a different county. The benefit is that it will give me experience: the drawbacks are many, but primarily the first few weeks to months will be hell, as all the creeps in the area introduce themselves to me.

I must have checked something that said I was interested in this…which I shouldn’t have, as three declines get one kicked off the list. I don’t know if that’s for a year or a lifetime, though.

And actually…I’m not really interested in that position. Kind of like I’m not really interested in the class I was offered for Spring semester…I mean, I really need a rest!

For now…well, it would be nice to take some time to calm down. I know that I’m looking for an entry-level position in an Academic Library, ideally. I want to spend the next few months reviewing HTML and CSS, then moving into JavaScript.

The class I was offered by Open University is a Tech course, but until I learn a Programming language for real, I don’t even know if I want to be in this path. I know that Database Management (DBM) was not where I wanted to be; I suspect the others of these classes may be like DBM.

I initially intended to go into Digital Services, but didn’t realize …just how technical it was going to be. And that I get intimidated by learning technical stuff, even though I’m drawn to it. (And yes, there is a gender component, here.) I’m thinking, why be in school unless you are learning something you can’t learn any other way?

As well: there is the matter of my Japanese-language study, which I’ve had to lay off of totally in order to focus on my schoolwork. I need to get back to that. And I want to take Cataloging and Classification, again. (I also want to read the various materials I’ve collected but did not have time to read!)

I mean, what if I actually am better off being a Cataloger or an Academic Librarian (or a Collection Developer?), rather than a Techie? What if I actually want to go back for an MA or MFA or PhD in something I love, and become a Subject Specialist in it? I’ve been afraid to limit my options, but if a specialized option is the best one…?

Talking to people isn’t so bad! It’s just when they push your boundaries and start dealing with you personally, that’s hard. Librarianship is a Service position, and along with that goes dealing with people you would rather not. It’s just that in an Academic Library, the service community is not necessarily, “anybody who walks in the door.”

What I had been looking at with Digital Services, though: that’s merging into an Information Sciences field. I chose this majorly because of having been ticked off in Cataloging & Classification, and not wanting to deal with the public, but still wanting to help a Library.

The major scare of this for me is the tough time I had in (Honors) Math, the distaste for math I’ve had since then, and my lack of having practiced it in any regular sense, ever since my Undergraduate work.

That, I think, is where the actual sticking point is: I’m an Arts and Humanities (and minorly, Social Sciences) person with interest in how Technology can further these; more than a Hard Sciences, Math, and Engineering, person. I do think, though, that I could handle talking in front of a group more easily than I could handle applying algorithms to Big Data.

Hmm. Maybe I should write to the person I spoke with recently, about this…

Anyhow, the following are my ideal priorities for the next six or so months:

  • review HTML
  • review CSS
  • learn JavaScript
  • review and extend Japanese Language
  • review/retake Cataloging & Classification
  • gain Entry-level position/experience in Academic Library
  • Read

I mean, that is basically, what I want; and I have time to deal with getting a job I’ll actually like, rather than one I’m forced into because of monetary concerns…

Expanding life.

Today has been kind of interesting. I’ve made inroads to inhabiting my office, again (it used to be a kind of third space between the kitchen/main living area, and the bedroom). Amazingly, not a lot of dust has accumulated in here.

D and I braved the rain so I could pick up a set of 30 half-sticks of the Rembrandt soft pastels, though I haven’t yet been gutsy enough to open them and see how fresh they are. (If they are ancient, I may need to take them back.) It was about $45 for 30 half-sticks, which amazingly enough is a good price for this brand. I intend on using this as a basis from which to branch out.

In addition, I’ve been installing some stuff on my machine. It took some effort to get around to it, because as is obvious to me, my anxiety pushes me away from installing anything…but if followed to an extreme, this kind of leads me to a place where I’m just running basic programs, and not really using the computer’s entire potential.

In any case…the laptop is now basically my primary computer. This is especially as I’ve reduced my time on the smartphone: I’ve started not to feel comfortable browsing the web with it — even my own stuff, here.

I’m also trying to figure out whether I should take pictures with my phone rather than my camera, given that my phone is much newer, and with it, I can actually select what to focus on, even if it isn’t in the middle of the frame. This isn’t really an option with my digital camera, which means essentially that my camera is training/forcing me to take naive pictures.

The thing is that I’ll need to have my transfer cable at the ready, because I only have about 5 gigs of space on my phone. Although…I did take a ton of photos about a week ago, and they take up less than four megs — but this is from the digital camera, which records in JPEG by default.

Unfortunately for this post, I think I’m going to have to get to bed sooner, rather than later. There’s still a lot to do. I am going to need to clean the office, the bedroom, and the bathroom. But, not tonight.

Natural flow from drawing to painting?

The couple of days since my Term Paper was due have been spent…basically, cleaning things up. There is now much more usable space on my craft table; a bunch of my storage has been cleaned and consolidated; and I’ve realized the disadvantage of having a watercolor palette with fixed wells.

Aside from this…

I’ve realized that when I went into the Art program at first, I took Color Dynamics before I took Painting. Consequently, I learned about color relationships before I learned about composition or image-making within painting (as versus drawing). It’s kind of evident, now. Do I want to take another Painting class?…Kind of. Will I have the time to? Not sure.

Could I learn it another way? Not sure. I’m pretty sure that by trial-and-error, I could learn, but that might be the scenic route. Of course, after college, the scenic route is the only route; it just helps to be on the right path, in the first place.

For me, painting is a natural outgrowth of drawing: monochrome bridges into color; markmaking bridges into broad swaths and washes; use of single colors and glazes, shift into color mixing. It largely came for me when I realized the limitations of using a single (narrow) point of contact (pencils, pens, markers: the extreme of which is Technical Pen, Mechanical Pencil, or Micron), a single color at a time, and not being able to shade the colors of my tools in the way in which I wanted.

The bridge here may be charcoal, which merges into pastel. By using the broad side of a stick of pigment, it’s possible to get closer to the feel of painting, as versus drawing. Pastel pencils can also provide that markmaking experience common to drawing, while providing some of the malleability of pastel.

The major reason to avoid pastel work is dust, which is something I haven’t quite reconciled, yet. I have not had a Drawing teacher who did not caution against breathing pastel dust. I do have an area where I can draw and not depend on a vacuum to pick up this dust; it is fairly necessary to avoid the vacuum. You want to wipe up pastel dust with a wet rag (what’s called “wet-mopping”), not blow it into the air or brush it away. This is for health reasons.

The brand of soft pastels I find myself most attracted to are Rembrandts. I’ve mentioned these before; the largest hazards in these seem to be white pigment (Titanium Dioxide), and black pigment (Lamp Black). Titanium White makes tints of colors, while Lamp Black makes shades.

Titanium Dioxide is a mechanical (not toxic) cancer risk. However, this is according to Proposition 65, a law passed here in California which relates whether tiny amounts of anything carcinogenic is in art supplies or foodstuffs (though I don’t think it applies to cosmetics). Prop 65 is kind of being overused, but I know enough art teachers who have battled cancer to take basic precautions against inhalation.

Lamp Black (a.k.a. Carbon Black) poses a slight toxic cancer risk and also may stain, meaning some kind of barrier, like gloves or barrier cream, may be useful here. However, when you work with art supplies…you kind of get used to slight cancer risks. Gloves or barrier cream, a mask, and basic caution not to get this stuff airborne, is the caution that I would ideally (but possibly not actually — in the case of skin protection) use.

I still have never used my jar of barrier cream, so I’m not certain if it rubs off on the image or stains the paper. I should try it and see what happens.

The biggest drawback besides this, is that it’s hard to mix colors when one wants to make intense marks of a certain shade that isn’t provided pre-blended. This is a drawback common to drawing supplies (markers, pens, colored pencils, chalks), more than painting supplies. However, it does pose a potentially useful limitation: more colors are not always better, if one gets so paralyzed by color choices that nothing gets drawn.

Right now I have a bunch of Conté crayons, a basic set of NuPastels, and a basic set of Sargent Art pastels, in addition to some monochrome soft Rembrandts I got about two years ago (before I went back to Library School). The thing about Rembrandts is that they do have a shelf life. At first, they’re creamy, soft, and smooth, to the point that they draw on your hands when touched; later on (after a number of years) they turn into what feels like dried-up Air Dry Clay, and can shatter if dropped. (They even tinkle like dried clay when they are dropped; which I suppose they basically are; kaolin [the material porcelain is made from] is a common base for these pastels.)

I did have a set of half-stick pastels around here from 2015 or something, but I can’t locate them at this moment. I did do a mass purge of pastels, though, after I got scared by the Prop 65 warnings so many years ago. At this point, though, there are Prop 65 warnings for seaweed, coffee, potato chips, ginger, etc…it’s really getting out of hand. (Though I do wish that people would stop putting lead chromate into turmeric…I mean, seriously.)

The problem is that the consumer warnings are based on law rather than science, and that we are warned about the contamination of products, but it seems that nothing is done about it. The system relies on pressure from consumers not buying the goods to encourage the manufacturers not to sell toxic products, rather than actually regulating the toxic products, or not bothering us if the risk is minimal or the exposure is unavoidable (I probably still have more soot in my lungs from having grown up next to a freeway, than I would be likely to inhale from using pastels). At a certain point, a person gets desensitized and just accepts that their world is carcinogenic and the only way not to be exposed is to live in a bubble…

But, I suppose, the upshot of this is that someone is paying attention to toxins in food, drugs, and art supplies. If Prop 65 didn’t exist, I most likely wouldn’t know about this.

So…I guess this post turned into a Pastel post. Hmm. I do know that I want to play with my charcoals, again, even though it’s dirty (maybe because it’s dirty?). Well, not only that, but charcoal is fairly noncommittal…

I have also wanted to do something with ink, and have a new bottle of “waterproof” ink. I’m not sure how it’s going to perform, but I know I can use it with brush and dip pen…(I wonder if I still have my reed pens?). I have used it once before, and at full strength, it’s very black, which is nice. The issue is whether it’s truly waterproof, and how well it dilutes.

It’s possible that I may need to edge myself back into painting through using ink and wash, and pastels, plus maybe graphite sticks and the woodless colored pencils. That place where drawing organically grows into painting…I don’t think I’m there, right now. And I don’t think that’s a reason to give up entirely. It’s not like I’m back at the beginning where I’m using mechanical and colored pencil…but I am not all the way to seriously using watercolor, or acrylic, right now.

That’s gotta be okay, that I’m not at my apex after not practicing for most of two years. It also means there is someplace to grow to…

What I began this post thinking about was the fact that I think I’ve devalued my own style (with pen and watercolor, which has been relatively illustrative) because of the fact that it comes easily to me. It wouldn’t necessarily be easy for others, though…

Maybe I should take the chance on getting outside and doing some sketches…


Open University?

Well, I did it. I requested a space for a class in Open University next semester. AM I WRONG???

It just so happened that after I submitted my Term Paper for the final class in my MLIS, I read in detail the pathway I had laid out for myself in regard to what classes I should have taken. There are 10-16 units (4 – 6 classes) that I could have but did not take in my Master’s program…largely because that would have meant that I would have been in my Master’s program for four years total (normally, these things run for only two years). It was also not required that I take those classes.

I was rushing to get out within the seven years provided to me (I entered the LIS program in 2012, then got culture-shocked and left after the first semester, staying away for three more years). The reason I didn’t take more Tech-oriented classes is that I had to — I mean, had to — take classes which were more Library-oriented in order to be able to graduate, even though some of these were classes (like “Political Advocacy”) I would not have chosen to take on my own.

There is one class that I’m similarly intimidated over, this being Big Data Analytics & Management. I’m expecting it to be like Database Management, which was an exceedingly difficult class for me. However…if it’s only one class per semester, it may be doable.

And here, I was expecting to go through online tutorials for Javascript, and retaking Cataloging, in the near future. If I do get into a class for Javascript, I’ll want to supplement it with work on my own. I am not looking forward to a repeat of Intro to Programming. Hopefully, the fact that there are outside reference sources, should help me here.

There is also a lot I want to read, both electronic and print. But yes, my folks were encouraging me to see when I could sign up for Spring. Only one class this time. Not kidding. If I ramp up my hours or get a better job (part-time or full-time)…I should still be able to handle one class. Even if it’s a Tech class, which basically all of them, are (excepting the Privacy class: that is more of an ethics and management class).

I know that my first choice, however, will enable me to have the skills to set up my own network when I need to. My second choice will expose me to Project Management (recommended by my Metadata professor); while my third will have me learning Javascript (which I am aiming to learn, anyway). Any one of those would be good.

And I don’t have to worry anymore about my ePortfolio and graduation. I just have to worry about keeping my GPA up, and finances…and finding a better-paying job. Right, and getting my driver’s license.

It was also a bit relieving to be able to renew a membership before Finals were over…student rates!

I did just get notification back from a counselor, who says to focus on the job search first, and I can always learn more later. This is…comforting. I don’t think I’m locked into taking any classes, yet; I’ve just put in an interest card.

There may be a more interesting post, next: I’m thinking about art, and my relation to it (particularly, my own art).