All right! Getting better at suminagashi

Yeys. 😉 I had another go with the suminagashi tonight. Overall, this batch looks much better than the first — though again, I was doing it with little sunlight remaining.  Right now the prints are being pressed; I should be able to document them tomorrow (I mentioned the trouble in taking photographs in artificial light, here). I should be able to post photos of them, tomorrow.

The colors are much nicer in this batch. I think that before, maybe I wasn’t using enough ink — and I was too conservative in my color schemes, plus I was agitating the water too much (which probably thinned the floating ink out). I met with a necessity to dispense a few more drops of Sumifactant toward the end (it was getting too dilute), as well as a few more drops of yellow.

Something also seemed to be happening with the ink getting mixed with the Sumifactant from a coated brush:  I had an issue with my blue ink towards the end of the printing process which resulted in the layer of ink not spreading as far as it should have (it only spread a little, whereas at the beginning, it spread expansively). I’m thinking that the issue had to have been related to surface tension.

In any case, I now have a new bunch of prints being pressed to dry. I should change out the papers soon; I can cut some Kraft paper down to size. No use utilizing the nice paper (copy paper:  not that nice, but can be put to other uses) for interleaving:  I’m also afraid that the chemicals used in printing will cause an ink transfer of my throwaway papers.

I also have one big, really nice print in semi-B5 size (7″x 10″, in Wet Media paper) in pink and violet.

But, things learned (other ones, at least?):

Skimming the old ink remnants off the top of the vat of water is not a crime. I did this with some old copy paper already used for interleaving, last night, which I think helped me avoid ink fragmentation in the empty areas of the prints (a bane that I found in my first batch last night).

And copy paper isn’t good for suminagashi printing, I found with my last print.

Don’t be afraid to use too much ink! Although yes, it was a precious commodity at school, where we all had to share one kit, realistically the Boku-Undo set of inks is designed to be dispensed drop by drop (using the included floating papers instead of Sumifactant).

Don’t be afraid to mix colors! I think that color mixing is the reason behind giving us the colors they did in that set:  I made a rich latte brown by contaminating orange with blue, but didn’t see it until I was rinsing out the palette. So it’s possible to go way beyond just using the inks straight. I had been mixing secondary colors (e.g. violet) and some tertiaries (yellow-green, yellow-orange, red-violet), but not ones with three or more distinct hue components (orange [red plus yellow] plus blue). The possibility of mixing earth tones is open to me.

I’ve got to be more careful about letting air bubbles underneath the papers. It happened at least three times this last time, and it’s really annoying if you’re going for an overall print that isn’t messed up somewhere in the middle.

Speaking of which — I may end up cutting my prints down with a straightedge and gridded cutting mat, because the interesting areas are generally not around the corners (which is where I was going to put my linocut prints, before cutting them apart). I do have a T-square, though it isn’t of much use without using a drafting table; I also have a plastic L-square, though, which may come in handy (it’s a ruler shaped like an “L” which can be lined up on my gridded cutting mat). I’ve just got to be careful not to shave down the L-square with my knife:  mine is probably intended to be of more use in marking than in cutting. I’ve just looked this up, and metal L-squares do exist:  something to keep in mind if I’m going to be doing a lot of prints!

My semi-B5 pad (7″x 10″) is about the right size for taking one big print of the vat, and even though it feels like a risk, I’m not lacking paper if it gets messed up. Plus, I can always cut down:  it’s harder to tape up.

I avoided using black ink at all in this last round, after seeing how it muddied some of my prints yesterday. It’s possible to mix a black with the three primaries, though it reveals color overtones when laid in the vat. I did still get a couple of muddied prints, which I remember (now) some students trying to save by putting them under running water. I just tossed them, though the thought of saving them is interesting. I should also remember that I can make other prints using the backs of messed-up sheets.

The blue given in the Boku-Undo set looks like a cyan to me, in pure form. To get Ultramarine hue, it needs to be mixed with red and a touch of green (which seems to cancel out some of the red and darken the tone towards black). I didn’t realize that my violet pan had turned Ultramarine last night until a relatively late stage. The blue just keeps getting darker and darker when contaminated with red — until it looks black — but that’s actually a concentrated violet (which doesn’t look so concentrated at all, when laid on the surface of the water). The green must dull it down slightly, this being why I started seeing it as burgundy (a desaturated violet-red) after a good amount of red was added (past the violet point)…muddied, it mellows out into a really nice deep reddish color. But I can’t remember how this looked when printed.

Oh, and:  today I tried agitating the water less, using mostly breath to ripple the water instead of a paintbrush handle (though I did use a brush handle a couple of times). This enabled bolder patterns and larger areas of color. I’m actually fairly amazed at how much more pleasant to look at, this batch is than the last one.

I’ll go cut down some papers to press my new little things, now…

One last remark:  I am having a really good time doing art without having drawing be central to the work. This stuff requires a lot of cutting and alternative methods of making images, but it’s still really fun! I was mentioning to the folks that even when just given different drawing implements, it changes one’s technique. And I’m not used to this, and it’s awesome. 🙂

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paintedstone

Haru ("Codey") is a second-year Master's student in Library and Information Science, hoping to find a way to fuse their desire to make the world a better place and to finance their art.

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