(Yes, Fall 2016 is now over…hurrahs may commence)

Hehehe!  I am officially done with classes (for a month, at least)–!  Though there are a few things I can still pick up, there’s no rush to do so (with the exception of my painting, tomorrow).

Now, I get to do things that I actually want to do!  (Once I can remember what those are…)

I expect there to be a few days in which I don’t know what I’m doing, or how best to use my time.  It happens at the beginning of every break.  Usually, there’s a long rest period, then I start to explore what I can do, then I start to do it, then the next semester starts up again–!

No, I mean, like, really.

I do have a lot of books which are available for me to read, which I didn’t have time to read while I was working on schoolwork.  In particular, I have a couple of books on Design, well– actually, three books, at least, on Design (focusing on Graphic and Web Design), and at least one new book on Watercolor painting.   And lest I forget, I do have three in-progress books on art practice.

Plus, I have my guitar–! though I will only be able to practice with that 30 minutes maximum today, before my fingers get too sore to continue.

And then, I also have plenty of art materials to play around with.  In particular…paints.  And inks.  Lots, and lots, of things that I can apply with brushes.  Which reminds me, that I really want to experiment a lot more with color mixing with those FW acrylic inks, given that even the neutrals seem vibrant…

There’s a lot about color mixing that I just wasn’t taught.  It seems to be different, as well, depending on media:  so whereas when I was painting with acrylics, it would be normal for me to mix from 5 or 7 base paints to get the color I wanted, apparently that’s not something done in watercolors?

I’ve found that when working with transparent watercolors and gouache, it may make the painting look disjointed to use too many different pigments to start off with.  This is, at least, unless heavy mixing is going on where you’re using differing proportions of most or all of the paints, in each color you’re laying down on your painting.  I was indeed doing that with my acrylic paints, but watercolors are just prone to getting contaminated, due to the way the paints disperse in water.  In addition, I tend to reuse my dried watercolors — at least, the transparent ones — so I am apparently concerned when the teacher turns my Aureolin well brown (it’s supposed to be yellow).  :/  (and Aureolin isn’t a cheap color!)

Acrylics, however…you lay out a full palette of those colors, and that paint is basically gone.  You can’t re-use acrylics unless you use plastic wrap to cover them and keep them from drying out.  A spray bottle full of water to wet them down doesn’t hurt, either.  The issue is that they dry out, and when they dry out, they also cure, and can’t be reworked.  Because of this, it isn’t a big deal if the paint on the palette gets contaminated, as it’s all a loss, anyway.  On top of this, the contamination stays limited to a small area, at least if one is using heavy-body paints.

As for what to do with the acrylic inks, I’m just going to have to experiment…though I suspect that they are closer in behavior to high-flow acrylic paints than to watercolors.  Like other acrylic-based paints, I put out a few drops of this stuff and I can never use it again!  But, the amazing thing is how far a few drops (especially three drops of each base color), goes.  For a small, 5.5″x7.5″ test paper, it’s plentiful.

I was experimenting on a cheap little plastic palette with little cups, which showed me how intermixable these are — on par with my heavy-body acrylics — and also how permanent they are!  (I should probably take a picture of that palette I ruined, so you all can see it.  I wouldn’t be able to accurately tell the color of any transparent paints or inks I used in the painted cups, again.)

So now I know to use the disposable palette sheets for these.  It’s not like the drips are going to run anywhere, unless I pick it up.

I am thinking, also, of the entire Web Design tangent — hence the books I obtained for myself during the semester which I didn’t get the time to read.  However, I know that it isn’t an easy option, especially when dealing with people trips me out, anyway; and people who want Design jobs done may have much more serious problems than “make our website pretty.”  How do you say to people, over and over again, “I know you hired me to make your website pretty, but you have these fundamental navigational and structural problems which we can also fix”…?  Although, that doesn’t sound so bad…if you can fix them.

Now that I know that Design isn’t totally “selling out” as an artist; that it requires a different set of skills than someone solely a visual artist may cultivate, and that someone solely a visual artist may not know about; it may become a viable option.  This is in addition to any learning I get done as regards Information Architecture and User Experience, in my program, in addition to my main Cataloging focus.  Coming up, I should be taking a Beginning Cataloging course along with a course on Metadata, and Research Methods…though it’s without question that I do want to learn how to construct Web pages.

I’m just really, really glad that I don’t have to focus on public service, anymore–!  I mean, seriously…

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paintedstone

Haru ("Codey") is a second-year Master's student in Library and Information Science, hoping to find a way to fuse their desire to make the world a better place and to finance their art.

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